1. Wednesday, July 28, 2004

    kirsten dunst came over last night 

    to watch barack obama with me. he was speaking at the dem convention.

    if you dont know barack youre not alone.

    currently he is an illinois state senator who is what many are calling the Future of the democratic party.

    in fact he is so badass that he is running for US Senator and nobody will run against him, not even Mike Ditka who has never been afraid to take on any challenge ever.

    Illinios is in love with Ditka. the SNL sketch that starred Chris Farley isn’t too far from the truth. people would take a bullet for the Coach.

    but given the opportunity to vote for Barack or the former Bear coach who beautifully put together the super bowl shuffle team of 1985 that included sweetness, mcmahon, dent, armstrong, and singletary… the masses are still willing to vote for Barack.

    18. buzznet $40

    19. san diego blog $11

    well kirsten and i watched the new kid in town and he wasnt bad.

    but to be honest, he wasnt all that amazing.

    id seen him in an interview a week ago with Chris Matthews and one-on-one he was mellow, sober, logical, well-spoken, and politically correct.

    when asked why he felt that he was justified to disagree with Kerry and many of the other US Senators who backed the war on Iraq, he simply said that based on the information that he had access to he felt it was an unneccessary war, but he admitted that the Senate had much more information than he had.

    last night however, kirsten and i noticed that he was a little uncomfortable in the spotlight of the nation. his hands were shaking, his gestures seemed unnatural, his volume wavered, and his message seemed muddled.

    except for at the very begining and at the very end.

    and during those moments we could easilly see what Illinois and Ditka saw: promise, hope, intelligence, and power. But delivered with a tone of reasonableness and sensibility.

    “he doesn’t even sound black,” kirsten said blazing through the bowl hagen-dass rocky road.

    here’s how Sen. Obama began:

    On behalf of the great state of Illinois, crossroads of a nation, land of Lincoln, let me express my deep gratitude for the privilege of addressing this convention. Tonight is a particular honor for me because, let’s face it, my presence on this stage is pretty unlikely. My father was a foreign student, born and raised in a small village in Kenya. He grew up herding goats, went to school in a tin-roof shack. His father, my grandfather, was a cook, a domestic servant.

    But my grandfather had larger dreams for his son. Through hard work and perseverance my father got a scholarship to study in a magical place; America which stood as a beacon of freedom and opportunity to so many who had come before. While studying here, my father met my mother. She was born in a town on the other side of the world, in Kansas. Her father worked on oil rigs and farms through most of the Depression. The day after Pearl Harbor he signed up for duty, joined Patton’s army and marched across Europe. Back home, my grandmother raised their baby and went to work on a bomber assembly line. After the war, they studied on the GI Bill, bought a house through FHA, and moved west in search of opportunity.

    And they, too, had big dreams for their daughter, a common dream, born of two continents. My parents shared not only an improbable love; they shared an abiding faith in the possibilities of this nation. They would give me an African name, Barack, or “blessed,” believing that in a tolerant America your name is no barrier to success. They imagined me going to the best schools in the land, even though they weren’t rich, because in a generous America you don’t have to be rich to achieve your potential. They are both passed away now. Yet, I know that, on this night, they look down on me with pride.

    I stand here today, grateful for the diversity of my heritage, aware that my parents’ dreams live on in my precious daughters. I stand here knowing that my story is part of the larger American story, that I owe a debt to all of those who came before me, and that, in no other country on earth, is my story even possible. Tonight, we gather to affirm the greatness of our nation, not because of the height of our skyscrapers, or the power of our military, or the size of our economy. Our pride is based on a very simple premise, summed up in a declaration made over two hundred years ago, “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal. That they are endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights. That among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.”

    That is the true genius of America, a faith in the simple dreams of its people, the insistence on small miracles. That we can tuck in our children at night and know they are fed and clothed and safe from harm. That we can say what we think, write what we think, without hearing a sudden knock on the door. That we can have an idea and start our own business without paying a bribe or hiring somebody’s son. That we can participate in the political process without fear of retribution, and that our votes will be counted – or at least, most of the time.

    then he got a little shaky, although the crowd hung in there with him. kirsten and i didnt. i yawned. she sat at the edge of her seat waiting for a lightening bolt of magic to fly from his mouth. maybe she was hoping for a young clinton, but black, and less of a skirt-chaser? she wouldnt get any of that.

    until the end.

    Now let me be clear. We have real enemies in the world. These enemies must be found. They must be pursued and they must be defeated. John Kerry knows this. And just as Lieutenant Kerry did not hesitate to risk his life to protect the men who served with him in Vietnam, President Kerry will not hesitate one moment to use our military might to keep America safe and secure. John Kerry believes in America. And he knows it’s not enough for just some of us to prosper. For alongside our famous individualism, there’s another ingredient in the American saga.

    A belief that we are connected as one people. If there’s a child on the south side of Chicago who can’t read, that matters to me, even if it’s not my child. If there’s a senior citizen somewhere who can’t pay for her prescription and has to choose between medicine and the rent, that makes my life poorer, even if it’s not my grandmother. If there’s an Arab American family being rounded up without benefit of an attorney or due process, that threatens my civil liberties. It’s that fundamental belief – I am my brother’s keeper, I am my sisters’ keeper – that makes this country work. It’s what allows us to pursue our individual dreams, yet still come together as a single American family. “E pluribus unum.” Out of many, one.

    Yet even as we speak, there are those who are preparing to divide us, the spin masters and negative ad peddlers who embrace the politics of anything goes. Well, I say to them tonight, there’s not a liberal America and a conservative America – there’s the United States of America. There’s not a black America and white America and Latino America and Asian America; there’s the United States of America. The pundits like to slice-and-dice our country into Red States and Blue States; Red States for Republicans, Blue States for Democrats. But I’ve got news for them, too. We worship an awesome God in the Blue States, and we don’t like federal agents poking around our libraries in the Red States. We coach Little League in the Blue States and have gay friends in the Red States. There are patriots who opposed the war in Iraq and patriots who supported it. We are one people, all of us pledging allegiance to the stars and stripes, all of us defending the United States of America.

    In the end, that’s what this election is about. Do we participate in a politics of cynicism or a politics of hope? John Kerry calls on us to hope. John Edwards calls on us to hope. I’m not talking about blind optimism here – the almost willful ignorance that thinks unemployment will go away if we just don’t talk about it, or the health care crisis will solve itself if we just ignore it. No, I’m talking about something more substantial. It’s the hope of slaves sitting around a fire singing freedom songs; the hope of immigrants setting out for distant shores; the hope of a young naval lieutenant bravely patrolling the Mekong Delta; the hope of a millworker’s son who dares to defy the odds; the hope of a skinny kid with a funny name who believes that America has a place for him, too. The audacity of hope!

    In the end, that is God’s greatest gift to us, the bedrock of this nation; the belief in things not seen; the belief that there are better days ahead. I believe we can give our middle class relief and provide working families with a road to opportunity. I believe we can provide jobs to the jobless, homes to the homeless, and reclaim young people in cities across America from violence and despair. I believe that as we stand on the crossroads of history, we can make the right choices, and meet the challenges that face us. America!

    the future might not be now. but it’s there and its nice to see it coming from a man of color, and a reasonable man from my home state.

    flagrant + layne + the many sides of gregory vaine + the metafilter kids ate it up