1. Monday, August 30, 2004

    John McCain was hot tonight. 

    if he was running for president this time out i would have a hard time not voting for him. it’s safe to say i probably would.

    Here are two excerpts.

    Remember how we felt when the serenity of a bright September morning was destroyed by a savage atrocity so hostile to all human virtue we could scarcely imagine any human being capable of it.

    We were united.

    First, in sorrow and anger.

    Then in recognition we were attacked not for a wrong we had done, but for who we are – a people united in a kinship of ideals, committed to the notion that the people are sovereign, not governments, not armies, not a pitiless, inhumane theocracy, not kings, mullahs or tyrants, but the people.

    In that moment, we were not different races.

    We were not poor or rich. We were not Democrat or Republican, liberal or conservative. We were not two countries. We were Americans.

    All of us, despite the differences that enliven our politics, are united in the one big idea that freedom is our birthright and its defense is always our first responsibility.

    All other responsibilities come second.

    We must not lose sight of that as we debate who among us should bear the greatest responsibility for keeping us safe and free. We must, whatever our disagreements, stick together in this great challenge of our time.

    My friends in the Democratic Party – and I’m fortunate to call many of them my friends – assure us they share the conviction that winning the war against terrorism is our government’s most important obligation. I don’t doubt their sincerity.

    They emphasize that military action alone won’t protect us, that this war has many fronts: in courts, financial institutions, in the shadowy world of intelligence, and in diplomacy.

    They stress that America needs the help of her friends to combat an evil that threatens us all, that our alliances are as important to victory as are our armies.

    We agree.

    And, as we’ve been a good friend to other countries in moments of shared perils, so we have good reason to expect their solidarity with us in this struggle.

    and then later he took a jab at Michael Moore who was in attendence (who had been kicked off the floor earlier because of “lack of credentials”, and later allowed to return, although “roped off“).

    After years of failed diplomacy and limited military pressure to restrain Saddam Hussein, President Bush made the difficult decision to liberate Iraq.

    Those who criticize that decision would have us believe that the choice was between a status quo that was well enough left alone and war. But there was no status quo to be left alone.

    The years of keeping Saddam in a box were coming to a close. The international consensus that he be kept isolated and unarmed had eroded to the point that many critics of military action had decided the time had come again to do business with Saddam, despite his near daily attacks on our pilots, and his refusal, until his last day in power, to allow the unrestricted inspection of his arsenal.

    Our choice wasn’t between a benign status quo and the bloodshed of war.

    It was between war and a graver threat. Don’t let anyone tell you otherwise. Not our critics abroad.

    Not our political opponents.

    And certainly not a disingenuous film maker who would have us believe that Saddam’s Iraq was an oasis of peace when in fact it was a place of indescribable cruelty, torture chambers, mass graves and prisons that destroyed the lives of the small children held inside their walls.

    Whether or not Saddam possessed the terrible weapons he once had and used, freed from

    international pressure and the threat of military action, he would have acquired them again.

    The central security concern of our time is to keep such devastating weapons beyond the reach of terrorists who can’t be dissuaded from using them by the threat of mutual destruction.

    We couldn’t afford the risk posed by an unconstrained Saddam in these dangerous times. By destroying his regime we gave hope to people long oppressed that if they have the courage to fight for it, they may live in peace and freedom.

    we need more leaders, from both side of the aisle to speak in these sorts of even terms. (even if theyre wrong.)

    reason’s convention blog + moore’s usa today column today + lemon odor + found on floor