1. Wednesday, February 3, 2016

    anti handwashing republican with alleged KKK ties part of GOP blockage 

    thom and grassley

    Sen. Thom Tillis, (R-NC) – seen here with the blue tie with Sen. Charles Grassley, (R-Iowa) –  is one of the GOP lawmakers who have seemingly agreed to stop any Obama nominated judge from being confirmed until the president is out of office.

    A year ago today Tillis, who was then a Freshman senator, was exposed as someone who thought it might be a good idea to let restaurants “opt out” of the requirement that its employees wash their hands after using the restroom.

    “I don’t have any problem with Starbucks if they choose to opt out of this policy as long as the post a sign that says ‘We don’t require our employees to wash their hands after leaving the restrooms.’ The market will take care of that,” Tillis said. There’s even video of him saying it clearly on C-SPAN.

    “That’s probably one where every business that did that would go out of business,” he added. “But I think it’s good to illustrate the point that that’s the sort of mentality that we need to have to reduce the regulatory burden on this country.”

    handwashingThat’s correct, the senator thinks that the law requiring one to washing ones hands after taking a dump is a burden.

    Just a few months ago the hacktivist group Anonymous claimed the Republican from Huntersville is involved with the KKK. Tillis was among a list of political figures that the group claimed had ties with the hate group.

    While the allegation has yet to be proven, Tillis is in favor of strict North Carolina voter ID laws that have been proven to keep minorities from voting. Tillis argues that such voting laws curb “widespread” voting fraud, but the enemy of many Republicans, science, has shown that of 1 billion votes cast since 2000 just 31 cases have been proven to be fraudulent.

    Regardless, Tillis is one of the GOP lawmakers who voted against the confirmation of Wilhelmina Wright, an African-American judge who was successfully confirmed as an Associate Justice of the Minnesota Supreme Court; which many in the GOP says will be one of the last of the Obama-appointed judges to be confirmed this year.

    “There is a point at which, traditionally, no additional judicial nominees are considered until the election,” Senate Majority Whip John Cornyn (R-TX), said referring to the election in November.

    In 2015, the Republican-controlled Senate confirmed a mere 173 total civilian nominees, according to the Congressional Research Service, about 100 fewer than were confirmed in 2007 when a Democratic Senate took over during the last two years of George W. Bush’s presidency.